Fact Friday: Paper Recycling

newspaperDid you know?

  • Recycling a single run of the Sunday New York Times would save 75,000 trees.
  • If all our newspaper was recycled, we could save about 250,000,000 trees each year!
  • The average American uses seven trees a year in paper, wood, and other products made from trees.
  • The amount of wood and paper we throw away each year is enough to heat 50,000,000 homes for 20 years.
  • Approximately 1 billion trees worth of paper are thrown away every year in the U.S.
  • Americans use 85,000,000 tons of paper a year; about 680 pounds per person.
  • The average household throws away 13,000 separate pieces of paper each year. Most is packaging and junk mail.
  • Every day, Americans buy about 62 million newspapers and throw out around 44 million of them. If we recycled just half our newsprint every year, we would need 3,200 fewer garage trucks to collect our trash.
  • Americans throw away the equivalent of more than 30 million trees in newsprint each year.
  • For every 15,000 tons of old newspaper recycled annually, 30 jobs are created to collect the paper, and 40 jobs are created to process the paper.
Share

Fact Friday: Trees!

 

Tree3Here are some cool facts about trees!

  • Trees are the longest living organism on earth.
  • Trees provide shade and shelter.
  • Trees lower air temperature by evaporating water in their leaves.
  • The average tree in an urban/city area has a life expectancy of only 8 years.
  • Tree roots stabilize soil and prevent erosion.
  • About one third of the United States of America is covered by forests.
  • A single tree can absorb one ton of carbon dioxide.
  • One acre of trees removes up to 2.6 tons of carbon dioxide each year.
  • The death of one 70 year old tree would return over 3 tons of carbon to the atmosphere.
  • Tree rings provide information about environmental events.
  • Trees grow from the top.
  •  A branch’s location on a tree will only move up the trunk a few inches in 1000 years.
  • Trees receive an estimated 90% of their nutrition from the atmosphere and only 10% from the soil.
Share

Recycle Your Christmas Tree

Christmas Tree

Real Christmas trees are biodegradable; they can be reused or recycled for mulch, sand and soil erosion barriers and are placed in ponds for fishes to use as shelter. Here are some great recycling options for your real Christmas tree.

Drop off Recycling Centers:  It’s no charge and you can usually take up to two trees to a drop-off location. Some centers might charge commercial/business drop offs depending on load length. Drop off centers require that you remove all tinsel, ornaments, lights, nails and tree stands before dropping off your tree.

Curbside Pick-up: Most cities will collect trees during the two weeks following Christmas. Some curbside programs might have a certain size limit along with requiring you to remove all ornaments from the tree. Flocked and artificial trees will not be accepted.

Mulching Programs: The Mulching Programs shred the trees, turning them into mulch to use in gardens. Check your local department of public works for more information.

Nonprofit Pick-up: You can call a local nonprofit organization to pick up your tree.

Never burn your Christmas tree! The firs and pines of the trees have a lot of sap, which can explode!

You can go to Earth911 to check on curbside pick-ups and local Christmas tree recycling events.

 

Share

Infographic Friday: Plant a Tree for Tomorrow

Trees that are planted take many years to grow before they are able to provide shade, and often those who planted them never see the trees fully grown. But that does not stop thoughtful individuals from planting row after row of trees, because they know that the next generation will have plenty of shade to rest under. Today’s quote reminds us that doing thoughtful and positive things, such as planting trees, can be hard work but is worth it if you begin with the end in mind. Making the world better for the next generation is always a worthwhile and admirable endeavor.

Share

Infographic Friday: Let Nature Inspire you

Frank Lloyd Wright was an American architect, interior designer, writer, and educator. He founded a philosophy known as organic architecture, in which he believed it possible to design structures in harmony with humanity and the environment. Fallingwater, Wright’s best known work, is a Pennsylvania home he designed that sits partly on top of a waterfall and is considered to be one of the top pieces of American architecture.

In 1991, Wright was recognized by the American Institute of Architects as the greatest architect of all time. He drew his inspiration from the world around him and from the beauty he found in nature and perhaps that is why his art continues to inspire us today.

Share

Hero of Sustainability Wangari Maathai Passes Away at Age 71

Last weekend, the world lost a luminary when Wangari Muta Maathai passed away at the age of 71 after a battle with ovarian cancer.

 The Kenyan native, whom we honored earlier this year as one of our “Heroes of Sustainability,” is known for being the first African woman and first environmentalist to win the Nobel Peace Prize, but that accomplishment is only one of her many firsts.

To continue reading this article, please visit: http://www.dolphinblue.com/pg-Hero-of-Sustainability-Wangari-Maathai-Dies-at-Age-71.html

Share