How to Plant a Bee-Friendly Garden

Bee Garden

Declines in bee populations have made headlines in recent years, both because of the possible reasons for the decline and because bees play such an integral role in ecosystems. Additionally, we rely on bees for food, since they pollinate many of the plants whose fruits and vegetables we eat. If you’re a home gardener, you can take steps to make your garden bee friendly. Doing so will not only help your plants — since the bees will pollinate many of them for you — it will also help maintain your local bee population. Continue reading

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Farmed Fish vs. Wild Fish

Photo: Flickr/Northwest Power and Conservation Council

What’s the difference between farmed and wild fish? Photo: Flickr/Northwest Power and Conservation Council

Fish is a lean protein that’s a major source of healthy omega-3 fatty acids, important vitamins such as calcium and iron, and essential minerals like magnesium and phosphorus. Studies have shown that including fatty fish in your diet is excellent for heart health and brain health. But not all servings of fish are created equal — the provided health benefits can be dependent on where the fish spent its life swimming.

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Reducing Red Meat

Photo: Flickr/Ronald Sarayudej

How much red meat is in your diet? Photo: Flickr/Ronald Sarayudej

If you’re like many Americans, eating healthier was one of your New Year’s resolutions. Now that 2015’s in full swing, you may have strayed from the goal, but there’s one easy way to get back on track: Cut down on your red meat consumption.

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Don’t Waste Homegrown Produce — Donate It!

Can you eat everything your garden's growing? If not, donate it!

Can you eat everything your garden’s growing? If not, donate it!

In the U.S., 40 percent of our food goes to waste. Upon hearing that statistic, many of us tend to think about the waste that occurs in our kitchens or in restaurants. A large portion of that waste, however, also takes place on farms because of logistical issues during harvest. Additionally, an increasing number of people grow food themselves in backyards and community gardens across the country, and sometimes food even gets wasted on these small “farms.” During good growing seasons with adequate rain and few pests, people can wind up with too much of a particular crop and then don’t know what to do with it.

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