Infographic Friday: Chief Seattle’s Inspiring Words

Former Vice President Al Gore’s book, Earth in Balance: Ecology and the Human Spirit, quotes an inspirational speech from Chief Seattle of the Squamish tribe. In 1854, Chief Seattle delivered his now famous speech to Isaac Williams, then Governor of Washington, while negotiating the sale of land that would some day become the city of Seattle, later named in the chief’s honor. Chief Seattle’s speech is revered by many for its heartfelt message and focus on respect and preservation of the environment.

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6 Natural Ways to Keep Your Home & Garden Pest Free

Catnip

Most cats adore catnip but this herb has been found to be very effective in repelling mosquitoes.

There are many ways to keep your home and garden pest free this summer without the use of harmful chemicals found in common pesticides. Check out Dolphin Blue‘s eco-friendly solutions below and let us know what you think!

  • Basil. Keep flies away by planting this great smelling herb in small pots along windowsills and doorways. Don’t forget to keep some of your basil in the kitchen in case you need to add some to your next meal.
  • Catnip. Add some of your cat’s favorite plant to your garden to keep mosquitoes away. Studies have shown that catnip can repel mosquitoes more effectively than the controversial pesticide DEET. You can also crush the leaves and rub them directly on your skin for added protection.
  • Citrus. Mix fresh-squeezed lemon or lime juice with water and spray along your windowsills and doorways to keep out pesky spiders. Spread the remaining citrus peels out in your garden to keep spiders at bay.
  • Vinegar. Fill a small dish with vinegar, a few drops of liquid dishwashing soap, and water to trap and kill fruit flies. You can also use vinegar to create a 1:1 solution of vinegar and water to wipe along surfaces in order to destroy the scent trails that ants use to navigate.
  • Cinnamon Bark Oil. Mix several drops of this essential oil in a 1:1 solution of water and denatured alcohol to help control dust mites in your home. Spray the mixture wherever dust collects.
  • Irish Spring Soap. You can hang, spike or sprinkle this soap near the areas of your yard that fall prey to hungry deer. They don’t like the smell and will stay away from your tasty lettuce, beans, and pansies.

Dolphin Blue’s lawn and garden section is ripe with sustainable products for your indoor and outdoor garden. Check them out on DolphinBlue.com!

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Infographic Friday: Guerilla Gardening

Ron Finley is an inspiring gardener in South Central Los Angeles. He plants vegetable gardens in some of the most unlikely places: abandoned lots, traffic medians, even along the curbs of neighborhood streets. Why does he do it? Check out the infographic below and then follow this link to watch his TED Talk. Maybe it will inspire you like it inspired us at Dolphin Blue.

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10 Ways You Can Keep The Coast Clean

According to reports from the Ocean Conservancy, there were more than 10 million pounds of trash littering our coasts last year.  The nation’s coastlines were covered in an array of items: cigarettes, food wrappers and containers, plastic bottles and bags, caps, lids, eating utensils, straws and stirrers, glass bottles, cans and paper bags, mattresses, even kitchen sinks!

Trash littering the coast can eventually end up in our oceans, affecting the wildlife we care about and the ecosystems that they depend on. But we can do something about it. Pledge to fight trash today and follow some of the simple tips below to do your part for a better tomorrow.

10 Things You Can Do For Trash Free Seas

Infographic courtesy of  Prevention.com

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Infographic Friday: National Parks of America

As our nation celebrates another birthday, we can’t help feeling appreciative of America’s national parks. The first national park, Yellowstone, was established in 1872 by President Ulysses S. Grant. Today, the United States has more than 400 national parks spanning more than 84 million acres of treasured and protected American land.

Explore your US national parks here or view the most-visited national parks and get inspired to plan your next trip.

US Nationa Parks

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Party Time: How to throw the greenest bash on your block

Summer is in full swing, and the longer days and warm temps make now the perfect time to throw an outdoor soiree, whether a small patio gathering or an all-out block party. As you can probably guess, though, these kinds of events often produce a lot of waste — each year Americans toss out enough paper and plastic cups, forks, and spoons to circle the equator 300 times, says the Clean Air Council.

SeptPoolParty-2

But you don’t have to be a part of those negative statistics — green can be the theme of your party, or you can incorporate eco-friendly principles into an event of any kind. Here are some tips for a backyard bash sure to please Mother Earth:


Invitations

nlg_bbqpoolpartyIf the party is going to be casual, sending an online invite is a great way to save. Sites like Evite.com offer tons of options to suit any kind of soiree, and it takes just minutes to put together something nice, no design skills necessary. But if a printed piece of paper would be more appropriate for your occasion, look for recycled paper and soy-based inks, like the products offered by Dolphin Blue. One especially fun option is to get paper with seeds inside that can then be planted — it makes for an invite that your guests won’t soon forget and sets the tone for your green party. Check out Bloomin’s seed paper, which contain wildflower seeds in every sheet.

Food
Think local, local, local. Buying from a farmers market not only gives you the freshest food Preserve TableWarepossible, it also supports your local economy. Go organic when you can, and serve finger foods — that way you can cut down on the waste of disposable plates and silverware (if there’s no way to get around using throwaway items, go with a company like Preserve Tableware, which offers plates, tumblers, and cutlery made from 100 percent recycled plastic). Try these black bean and corn quesadillas from celebrity chef Emeril Lagasse; see more green recipes here.

If it’s a really big bash and you have tons of food left over, consider donating it to a food bank. Find one in your area at Feeding America’s site.

Décor and Centerpieces
Instead of using cut flowers in vases as a centerpiece, try potted plantsgrp_edr_centerpiece_april, which you can then keep or give to your guests as favors. Fruit (locally grown, of course) also makes for a fun decoration, and artfully arranging oranges, lemons, or limes in a centerpiece adds a bright pop of color to your table setting.

Even branches can make an elegant centerpiece (really!). If the party’s at night and you need a little light, try soy candles. Look around your house or backyard to see what you might have that would work — anything recycled is eco-friendly, and your creativity will be applauded by your guests.

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Really Make Your Lawn “Green”: Eco-Friendly Tips for a Sustainable Yard

Eco-Friendly Tips for a Sustainable YardThe most commonly irrigated crop—the plant that receives 4 billion gallons of potable water a day, the plant that the average American spends 150 hours a year tending, and the plant that North America alone spends $40,000,000,000 a year on—is not the crop that will feed the world. In fact, it is not a crop that will feed anybody, except maybe some lucky cows.

American’s lawns are often more trouble than they are worth. We spend so much time, effort, money, and resources on keeping our lawns green and kempt, yet lawns do not provide us with food, need poisons and fertilizers to grow well, and decrease the biodiversity of the area. Yet, in most residential neighborhoods, the dream of the perfect lawn doesn’t seem to be going anywhere. Lawns are the norm. But, maybe it’s time to rethink this norm, or at least adjust our lawn practices to be more environmentally friendly and less work for you.

Some Alternatives to Lawns
These beautiful, healthy alternatives to a lawn can bring a sense of nature’s true beauty to your home.

  • Vegetable Gardens: For all the time you put into your yard, wouldn’t it be nice if you got something out of it? Replacing part or all of your lawn with a vegetable garden would grow food that could support you, your family, and even your community.
  • Native Plants: Growing a variety of plants that are native to your area instead of the monoculture of grass seeds we have today, will end up being less work for you! Native plants need less water and fertilizers, and they will create ecosystems for the local fauna to form a sturdy, healthy environment.

EPA Suggestions
If you’re not quite ready to uproot your whole lawn, but still want to have a healthier impact on your environment, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has these handy tips:

Mowing:

  • The ideal height for a lawn is generally 2 ½ to 3 inches. The taller the top of the grass, the longer the roots, making for a stronger, healthier grass that can absorb water much more easily and leaves no exposed dirt in which weeds can grow.
  • Use a push mower instead of the gas- or electric-powered kind that causes pollution.
  • After mowing, leave the grass clippings on the lawn as a fertilizer. Less work for you!

Watering:

  • Your lawn only needs 1 inch of water per week. You can measure this using an empty tuna can!
  • Water before 10:00AM so the grass has time to soak it all up. Perpetually wet grass grows fungi.
  • In July and August, let your lawn go brown. Brown lawns are dormant, not dead!
  • The best rule is to water only when the lawn begins to wilt from dryness—when the color dulls and footprints stay compressed for more than a few seconds.

Fertilizing:

  • If you must fertilize your lawn, remember that fertilizers are NOT water soluble! Fertilize right after it rains (not before) so the fertilizer stays on your lawn instead of running off and draining into our water sources.

An alternative to conventional, petroleum-based fertilizers are all-natural fertilizers like those that Dolphin Blue sells. Check out more ways you can make your life more environmentally friendly at dolphinblue.com!

(This blog was written by Dolphin Blue’s amazing intern, Elisa Rivera.)

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Barbecue the Green Way

BarbecueNothing’s better than a backyard bash you can invite friends and neighbors to. A solar oven is your best bet for grilling the green way, but there are other ways to reduce your impact.

Prep your grill with olive oil and a scrub brush, clean it with baking soda, get your food locally, and stock up on dishes and cutlery that can be used again. If you have a regular grill, remember that propane burns cleaner than charcoal or wood.

When it comes to eating your delicious grilled goods, the plates, bowls, cups, and utensils from Preserve Tableware offered on Dolphin Blue’s site contain 100 percent post-consumer recycled content, are dishwasher-safe, and can be reused forever.

Grill on!

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Is Dallas Walkable?

The Dallas Arts District is one of the city's walkable neighborhoods.

The Dallas Arts District is one of the city’s walkable neighborhoods.

We love our hometown of Dallas at Dolphin Blue, but it hasn’t always had a reputation for being a very easy place to get around without a car. Bike lanes and the expansion of DART (Dallas Area Rapid Transit, our light rail system) are changing that, and we’re thrilled that gas-guzzling vehicles aren’t the only way to traverse the city. Here are some great ways to get from here to there:

By foot: Yes, Dallas is walkable (at least parts of it). Explore the neighborhoods of the Dallas Arts District, Uptown, the West End Historic District, and Deep Ellum by hoofing it. See what you can do in each area in this Texas Journey article.

By bike: The BikeDFW nonprofit advocates for cycling in North Texas and sponsors related events.

By light rail: Take a look at DART‘s network — stops include the Dallas Zoo, the American Airlines Center, and Fair Park. This summer, families (with two adults and up to four kids) can get a regional day pass for just $10 on Saturdays.

By bike that someone else pedals: Don’t have the energy or the equipment to pedal yourself around town? Dallas Pedicabs does the tough work, shuttling you along various downtown routes.

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3 U.S. Cities for Biking

Biking across the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco is just one great place to go by bike in Walk Score's third most bike-friendly city.

Biking across the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco is just one great place to go by bike in Walk Score’s third most bike-friendly city.

For a sustainable — and just plain enjoyable — way to get around, look no further than a bicycle. You can cover a lot of miles with just two wheels, but you won’t be making the carbon footprint you would be on four wheels. Here are the top three U.S. cities for biking, according to WalkScore.com.

Minneapolis, Minnesota
Bike Score: 79

Perhaps it’s the frigid winters that bond the bike couriers, road racers, BMXers, and recreational cyclists in Minneapolis, Walk Score’s winner for bikeability in the United States. If you’re visiting, the Grand Rounds trail nearly circles the entire city, while the Mississippi River Trail follows both sides of the river, to name just two big routes. Learn more about the bike scene in Minneapolis here.

Portland, Oregon
Bike Score: 70

Often considered the cycling capital of the U.S., Portland is a leader thanks to bike lanes, low-traffic bike boulevards, off-street paths, bike parking corrals, and a very lively bike culture. While you’re there, combine two of Portland’s loves — beers and bikes — with a Brewcycle tour (a 15-seater bike contraption that goes from brewery to brewery) or a Pub Peddler Brewery Tour from Portland Bicycle Tours.

San Francisco, California
Bike Score: 70

One of the must-do activities while in the City by the Bay is to rent a bike along the waterfront and pedal across the Golden Gate Bridge to Sausalito. The views both approaching the bridge and from among its orange-hued towers are spectacular on a clear day (and the good news is that the wind cooperates with you on the way back, so it’ll be comparatively easier pedaling). Try San Francisco Bicycle Rentals or another of the many shops around town for a good cruising bike.

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