Infographic Friday: Autumn Inspiration

Albert Camus was a French writer and philosopher who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957. As autumn is now in full-swing, his quote is able to capture the subtle beauty of the season by comparing fall leaves to spring flowers. We can find so much inspiration in the natural cycle of nature. Don’t forget to stop and enjoy the changing colors this month by taking a walk around your neighborhood or in your favorite park!

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Infographic Friday: Mud-Luscious

E. E. Cummings was a famous American poet, painter, and author. His work is filled with beautiful images of nature and he often turned his eyes to the environment for inspiration. He was able to capture both the awkwardness and the harmonious elements of nature and convey its beauty to the reader with his unique style.

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Infographic Friday: Plant a Tree for Tomorrow

Trees that are planted take many years to grow before they are able to provide shade, and often those who planted them never see the trees fully grown. But that does not stop thoughtful individuals from planting row after row of trees, because they know that the next generation will have plenty of shade to rest under. Today’s quote reminds us that doing thoughtful and positive things, such as planting trees, can be hard work but is worth it if you begin with the end in mind. Making the world better for the next generation is always a worthwhile and admirable endeavor.

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Infographic Friday: Be Bold, Be You

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was an inspirational writer and politician who lived during the 1800′s and is considered by many to be the German Shakespeare. He not only wrote poetry and novels, he also penned treatises on botany, color, and anatomy. His famous quote reminds us to believe in ourselves, to be bold, and to create our own opportunities.

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Infographic Friday: A Sea of Plastic

Captain Charles Moore was taking part in a yachting competition across the Pacific when he accidentally discovered what some have called the world’s largest “landfill” – an endless floating waste patch of plastic garbage known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Double the size of Texas, the water-bound swath of floating trash is trapped in a slow whirlpool called the Pacific Gyre, outweighing the surface water’s biomass by as much as six-to-one in some areas.

Since his discovery, Captain Moore has become dedicated to analyzing the huge litter patch and the harmful effects it has on ocean life. He founded the Algalita Marine Research Foundation and captains his research vessel, the Alguita, as he documents the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Through his research, he hopes to raise awareness about the plastic litter problem in our oceans and help to find ways to reduce it.

Follow this link to learn more about Captain Charles Moore and how he’s working toward a plastic pollution-free world!

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Infographic Friday: Let Nature Inspire you

Frank Lloyd Wright was an American architect, interior designer, writer, and educator. He founded a philosophy known as organic architecture, in which he believed it possible to design structures in harmony with humanity and the environment. Fallingwater, Wright’s best known work, is a Pennsylvania home he designed that sits partly on top of a waterfall and is considered to be one of the top pieces of American architecture.

In 1991, Wright was recognized by the American Institute of Architects as the greatest architect of all time. He drew his inspiration from the world around him and from the beauty he found in nature and perhaps that is why his art continues to inspire us today.

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D is for Donate, F is for Food

It’s that time of year again; back to school time! And whether you’re a student, teacher, or parent, you’re busy getting ready to have a great school year. You may have already bought the school supplies that you need from Dolphin Blue, but before you present your new teacher with a shiny apple on the first day of school, chew on this food for thought.

The National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) recently released a report revealing that 40% of food in the U.S. goes uneaten. Americans throw away about $165 billion worth of food each year, filling up landfills with food waste that accounts for a quarter of harmful U.S. methane emissions. But even though we waste a mind-boggling amount of food, one out of every six Americans is food insecure, meaning they aren’t sure where they will get their next meal or if they will get one at all. Luckily, you and your school can help make a difference this year.

Schools all over the country are implementing food donation programs to help offset American food waste and food insecurity issues. Thanks to recent legislation and the Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act, public schools and food donors can donate unused food items without liability or risk. Elementary schools are donating unopened cafeteria food to local shelters and food banks. Colleges and universities are implementing new donation programs fueled by student volunteer groups who pick up unused food from campus dining halls and deliver it to local soup kitchens.

Reducing food waste by 15 percent could save enough food to feed more than 25 million people each year. Limiting food waste also saves energy and precious resources like land and water. So, after you get your lunch packed and your notebook ready, take a lesson from thoughtful students around the country and learn how you can start a food donation program at your school. Call your local food bank to learn more about how you can help reduce food waste and start making green waves today!

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Infographic Friday: Chief Seattle’s Inspiring Words

Former Vice President Al Gore’s book, Earth in Balance: Ecology and the Human Spirit, quotes an inspirational speech from Chief Seattle of the Squamish tribe. In 1854, Chief Seattle delivered his now famous speech to Isaac Williams, then Governor of Washington, while negotiating the sale of land that would some day become the city of Seattle, later named in the chief’s honor. Chief Seattle’s speech is revered by many for its heartfelt message and focus on respect and preservation of the environment.

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