Reduce Paper Plate Waste

According to Greenyour.com, offices consume disposable plates, cups, and cutlery for meetings and conferences and every day lunch breaks. The average 2,500-person conference will produce waste to the tune of 75,000 disposable cups, 87,500 paper napkins, and 90,000 cans or bottles. In an average year, most office workers throw out 500 disposable cups!

How many paper cups and plates from your home make it to the recycling bin? Most waste is needless given all used paper cups and plates can be recycled if cleaned. Dirty paper bowls and plates that are uncoated are approved for composting. Also, choosing reusable dishes and flatware can go a long way to cutting overall trash. Even a small change like using pitchers instead of water bottles could make a huge difference over time.

Try these helpful tips to start reducing your home or office kitchen waste today:

  • Serve guests drinks in pitchers instead of using wasteful plastic bottles
  • Choose dishes and cutlery made from recycled content
  • Use a reusable mug for coffee and take reusable dishes when you have to eat on-the-go
  • Recycle as many paper products as you can from fast food and takeout

For a quick and easy guide on recycling and composting, see this brochure from University of Berkeley. For a relatable story of how one woman stopped an addiction to paper plates, read “Guilt on a Paper Plate” by Larissa Kosmos, guest blogger for the NYTimes. Browse Dolphin Blue’s selection of recycled tableware and kitchenware for the office.

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D is for Donate, F is for Food

It’s that time of year again; back to school time! And whether you’re a student, teacher, or parent, you’re busy getting ready to have a great school year. You may have already bought the school supplies that you need from Dolphin Blue, but before you present your new teacher with a shiny apple on the first day of school, chew on this food for thought.

The National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) recently released a report revealing that 40% of food in the U.S. goes uneaten. Americans throw away about $165 billion worth of food each year, filling up landfills with food waste that accounts for a quarter of harmful U.S. methane emissions. But even though we waste a mind-boggling amount of food, one out of every six Americans is food insecure, meaning they aren’t sure where they will get their next meal or if they will get one at all. Luckily, you and your school can help make a difference this year.

Schools all over the country are implementing food donation programs to help offset American food waste and food insecurity issues. Thanks to recent legislation and the Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act, public schools and food donors can donate unused food items without liability or risk. Elementary schools are donating unopened cafeteria food to local shelters and food banks. Colleges and universities are implementing new donation programs fueled by student volunteer groups who pick up unused food from campus dining halls and deliver it to local soup kitchens.

Reducing food waste by 15 percent could save enough food to feed more than 25 million people each year. Limiting food waste also saves energy and precious resources like land and water. So, after you get your lunch packed and your notebook ready, take a lesson from thoughtful students around the country and learn how you can start a food donation program at your school. Call your local food bank to learn more about how you can help reduce food waste and start making green waves today!

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MillerCoors Stops Getting Wasted

MillerCoors Golden, COBetween Denver and The Rocky Mountains of Colorado sits the quaint city of Golden, home of MillerCoors, the largest brewery in America. Back in 1873, Adolph Coors chose the site to brew his famous beer because of the high quality Rocky Mountain spring water available in the area. And now, MillerCoors has entered into sustainability history books as the first brewery of its size to become landfill-free.

MillerCoors has been taking steps over the past two years to increase their recycling efforts, investing $1 million for balers, choppers, compactors, colored cans and signage.  Efforts to move to a no-waste facility started by removing personal trash cans then lead to a strict color-coded recycling bin system: yellow for aluminum, white for plastic shrink wrap, gray for scrap metal, and green for wood to eventually be ground into mulch.

Company leaders tracked monthly employee progress to gradually reduce the amount of waste they were sending to landfills. As goals were met, they were celebrated with gifts of T-shirts and tree saplings.

MillersCoors is now diverting 135 tons of waste out of landfills every month. Spent grains from the production of the 346 million gallons of beer are used to feed cattle. Discarded glass is sent to a nearby plant to create new bottles. Cardboard is sent to mills. Plastic wrapping is made into grist for composite decking at homes. And metals are taken to scrap yards for re-sale into global commodities markets.

The brewery in Golden is now the fifth of MillerCoors’ eight U.S. breweries to gain landfill-free status. According to the company, no other breweries in the U.S. have managed to achieve this milestone.

Like MillersCoors, Dolphin Blue is also strongly committed to sustainability. We only carry products that are made in the U.S. and are, at minimum, made of 20% post-consumer recycled material. We should all cheers MillerCoors for their green efforts and toast to their conscious capitalism. Visit the Dolphin Blue store to purchase eco-friendly products for home and office.

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Recycle, Reuse, Recaffeinate

Nothing says “welcome back to the work week” quite like an extra long line at your favorite coffee shop on Monday morning.  This could brighten your day: get a discount by bringing in your own reusable coffee mug or tumbler.  To curb the excessive waste caused by all the disposable coffee cups they sell, many coffee shops offer discounts to their eco-conscious customers.  Check out the infographic below to learn more and contact your local coffee hangout to find out what kind of discount you can get by bringing in your own cup.  The savings for your pocket book AND the environment can really add up.

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Infographic Friday: Sweden Wants Your Trash

All but 4% of the trash produced in Sweden bypasses the landfill and is either recycled or used as fuel in their waste-to-energy programs.  Sweden is able to generate 20% of the energy they need to heat the country and also provide electricity for 250,000 homes.  They’re so successful in their recycling and waste-to-energy programs, they’re actually running out of trash.

Sweden has begun to import tons of trash from neighboring countries in order to gather burnable waste so they can incinerate it and create energy.  Countries like Norway are paying them to take their waste, since it’s more expensive for the Norwegians to burn the trash in their own country and they lack recycling programs.

Waste-to-energy initiatives have been introduced in Italy, Romania, Bulgaria, and Lithuania.  In the USA, 67% of our waste ends up in landfills.  Hopefully someday, we can follow in the eco-friendly footsteps of our European friends.

Sweden burns trash to create about 20 percent of its heat, but the Swedes are so diligent about recycling that the country simply isn’t generating enough waste to create the heat they need.

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Operation Kindness: Dolphin Blue Reaches Out to Tornado Survivors

On the afternoon of May 20, 2013, a category EF5 tornado devastated the city of Moore, Oklahoma, taking the lives of more than two-dozen residents and injuring hundreds more. With winds estimated at 210 mph, the twister ripped through the Oklahoma City suburb leaving a path of destruction 1.3 miles wide and 17 miles long. Unfortunately, block after block of flattened homes and businesses is not new to Moore. In 1999, another deadly EF5 tornado destroyed the area, following an eerily similar storm path. Once again, the residents of Moore were left to pick up the pieces.

Home destroyed by the powerful tornado that ripped through Moore, OK.

Homes destroyed by the powerful tornado that ripped through Moore, OK on May 20, 2013.

Dolphin Blue’s Accounting Manager, Robin Lynn, was quick to put out the call for local donations and organize a goodwill trip to Moore in an effort to relieve the burden and show support for survivors.  She collected clothes, canned goods, bottled water and everyday supplies from friends, family and coworkers.  Robin also worked with Dolphin Blue CEO, Tom Kemper, to handpick items to donate from the Dolphin Blue store such as Preserve kitchenware, personal care items from Nourish, cleaning products from Mrs. Meyers and Better Life, and Green Toys.

Dolphin Blue Accounting Manager, Robin Lynn, greets Moore, OK tornado survivors with kindness and donations.

Dolphin Blue’s Robin Lynn greets tornado survivors with kindness and donations.

After loading up her truck and making the three hour trip to Moore, Oklahoma, Robin surveyed the heartbreaking wreckage of homes in the area. She met with local residents who were volunteering with humanitarian organizations heading up the relief efforts in the area and donated the items she had collected.

After returning home Robin reflected, “The effects of the tornado were devastating, but the kindness and appreciation from so many people coming together to help their fellow neighbors was truly inspiring. There is a powerful energy in Moore, OK, that I think will allow them to overcome this adversity.”

Dolphin Blue is proud of Robin and her heart-lead efforts to support the survivors of the Moore, Oklahoma tornado.  If you wish donate or volunteer to the ongoing relief efforts, please click here to find out ways you can help.

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Straight Talk with Tom

Is the US Chamber serious? Or, is this just their attempt at wanting to be perceived as being green?  

As I read ”3 Takeaways from the US Chamber’s Sustainability Conference“ published by GreenBiz, it made me feel like the US Chamber, an organization that is continually trying to appease its biggest polluting members, speaking out and lobbying against any attempts to regulate environmental degradation of Planet Earth, is now trying to gain goodwill and positive PR by appearing to align with the vast community of sustainability proponents, who DO believe we humans, our processes and consumption, ARE having dramatically-negative effects on our planet’s climate and its sustainability. Kinda looks to me like the US Chamber and its corporate citizenship affiliate the Business Civic Leadership Center (BCLC) are speaking two distinctly different conversations! So, which is the truth here?


To continue reading this article, please visit http://www.dolphinblue.com/pg-Straight-Talk-with-Tom-Is-the-US-Chamber-serious.html

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Leaked Emails Suggest Firmer Oversight Needed by Board of US Chamber of Commerce

There is growing evidence that many American businesses are attempting to become more environmentally responsible. Some of those businesses are represented on the board of directors of the US Chamber of Commerce. This suggests that the Chamber should eventually move toward supporting…

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Challenge to the US Chamber of Commerce: What One Small Business Is Doing


Dolphin Blue, Inc
., is just one small business among millions of small businesses, but it is unique. It is the only online supplier of 100% environmentally responsible office supplies. Supplies that are not environmentally responsible are simply not available from Dolphin Blue.

Dolphin Blue is unique in another way. It has challenged the national US Chamber of Commerce to…

To continue reading this article, please visit http://www.dolphinblue.com/pg-Petition-Blog.html 

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Heroes of Sustainability: Bob Willard

Bob Willard, Corporate Straight Shooter

 Some people talk the talk about sustainability — Bob Willard talks it, walks it, and drives it (he has two hybrid vehicles). A longtime businessman, Willard spent 34 years at IBM Canada before becoming a leading expert on corporate sustainability.

 With three books under his belt – The Sustainability Advantage (2002), The Next Sustainability Wave (2005), and The Sustainability Champion’s Guidebook (2009) — Willard is among the best at laying out a clear, actionable plan for business leaders to follow in order to institute more-sustainable policies within their companies.

 “Sooner or later, there is a tough message that sustainability champions need to deliver to harried business leaders — the business game they are playing can’t continue,” Willard writes. “It’s been fun, but if they keep playing the game the way they are, everyone will lose.”

 Delivering that tough message is what Willard has made his mission, and to support it, he’s developed hundreds of keynote presentations, numerous webinars, two DVDs, and a Master Slide Set to drive home the point that if we want to have clean air, potable water, nutritious food, and adequate shelter, something has to change in the way corporations do business — and fast.

 Willard’s talent is in quantifying and selling the business value of corporate sustainability strategies to CEOs and other C-level personnel. “Executives might think you are trying to convince them that sustainability is a nobler goal than contending with gnarly business issues like complexity, resource scarcity, and talent shortages,” Willard writes. “It’s sometimes better to back off and reframe sustainability strategies as enablers of executives’ priorities, rather than as another nagging goal to worry about.”

 To communicate effectively, Willard uses sales techniques widely successful in business: He talks the language of the decision-makers, meets them where they are, and makes the connection between what they’re already doing and what they could be doing. He has a personal commitment to sustainability, having been turned on to the importance of the issue when, after plans surfaced in his community to build a water treatment plant downstream from a nuclear power plant, he realized that those in charge weren’t looking out for the well-being of the community members. Since then, environmental issues and taking personal responsibility for making a difference have been at the forefront of his life and work. But even those who haven’t caught the sustainability bug the way Willard has would do well to follow the advice he lays out. “The bottom-line payoff comes from increased revenue, innovation, and productivity, as well as risk-mitigation and eco-efficiency cost-savings,” he writes.

 For more information about Bob Willard, visit www.sustainabilityadvantage.com, and read an excerpt from The Sustainability Advantage here.

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